The Bristol areas where Eat Out had some of the biggest uptake in the UK

the bristol areas where eat out had some of the biggest uptake in the uk - The Bristol areas where Eat Out had some of the biggest uptake in the UK

New data has revealed two areas in the Bristol region were some of the most successful across the UK in the Eat Out To Help Out scheme.

Official government figures have been released showing the number of registered restaurants, meals claimed for, total amount of discount claimed, and the average discount per meal in each UK parliamentary constituency.

Bristol North West had the highest number of meal claims (3,245) per restaurant anywhere in the UK, followed by Filton and Bradley Stoke in South Gloucestershire (2,615).

Bristol North West had 57 restaurants registered with 185,000 meals claimed and a total discount of £641,000 made.

Eat Out To Help Out: How Bristol fared

Bristol West

Registered restaurants = 371

Meals claimed = 290,000

Total discount claimed = £1,497,000

Average discount per meal = £5.175.17

Bristol North West

Registered restaurants =57

Meals claimed = 185,000

Total discount claimed = 641,000

Average discount per meal = 3.473.47

Bristol South

Registered restaurants = 69

Meals claimed = 43,000

Total discount claimed = 188,000

Average discount per meal = 4.324.32

Bristol East

Registered restaurants = 33

Meals claimed = 31,000

Total discount claimed = 123,000

Average discount per meal =3.993.99

Filton and Bradley Stoke had 39 restaurants signed up, with 102,000 meals claimed and a discount of £317,000 made.

A member of staff at The Three Brooks pub in Bradley Stoke said the scheme provided a huge boost for the pub when contacted by Bristol Live.

She said: “We were really busy throughout August and our owners, Ember Inns, decided to extend the scheme for two weeks as a result.

the bristol areas where eat out had some of the biggest uptake in the uk 2 - The Bristol areas where Eat Out had some of the biggest uptake in the UK
Three Brooks

“It was lovely to see a busy pub and the majority of our customers were really friendly.

“We found that some customers waited until the very last minute to book a table and sadly we had to turn some people away as we were full, which was a shame.

“I’m not really sure why Filton and Bradley Stoke was one of the best areas for Eat Out To Help Out, but I’m glad it was.”

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Sky News reported restaurants in Birmingham Hall Green claimed the highest sums of money under the government’s initiate, which entitled diners to 50 per cent off their meal up to £10 between Monday and Wednesday in August.

The average claim per restaurant in the Midlands constituency was over £14,200, with £2.3m received by the 165 restaurants there that took part in the initiative.

People in Rayleigh and Wickford in Essex had the highest discount of all the constituencies – an average saving of £8.22 per meal, while the lowest was in Liverpool Walton at £2.80. The UK average was about £6.

Bristol had smallest growth in footfall in South West

Despite diners snapping up 185,000 discounted meals in Bristol North West, data released from think tank Centre for Cities found the boost Eat Out To Help Out brought to Bristol was much smaller compared to other towns and cities across the South West.

Using mobile phone data, the tracker showed the scheme resulted in a seven percentage point increase in footfall on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings in early August, compared to late July.

Bristol’s increase was significantly lower than Bournemouth, where the scheme boosted city centre footfall by 23 percentage points over the same period – the biggest rise in the UK.

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It was also smaller than in Gloucester and Cardiff, which both increased by 13 percentage points.

However, Bristol’s growth is in line with the national urban average, which saw other cities such as Manchester and Leeds only grow six percentage points and Birmingham grow by eight.

Overall (including days outside the scheme), Bristol’s footfall has increased by 11 percentage points since the end of June, meaning footfall in the city centre is 56 per cent lower than it was before lockdown.

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