We’ve heard the term, but what is a hung parliament and what would it mean

weve heard the term but what is a hung parliament and what would it mean - We've heard the term, but what is a hung parliament and what would it mean

weve heard the term but what is a hung parliament and what would it mean 2 - We've heard the term, but what is a hung parliament and what would it mean

On Thursday the public will again be summoned to the polls again to decide who will lead the country – but what happens when one party does not win enough parliamentary seats to get a majority?

This is when we see a hung parliament.

If a party fails to take the majority – 326 seats of the 650-seat House of Commons – the leader of the party with the most seats is given the opportunity to form a Government.

The leader can either go into a formal coalition with other parities in which the partners share ministerial jobs – this happened between the Conservatives and Lib Dems in 2010.

Or the leader could take on a “confidence and supply” arrangement with smaller parties which would agree on main legislation – this happened between the Conservatives and the DUP in 2017.

If neither work, the Prime Minister must ask the Queen to invite someone else to form a Government.

As the bookies, however, and a hung parliament outcome is very unlikely with all offering short odds on a Conservative majority.

Back to: Home Bristol NewsSource: Bristol Post

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